Forum Posts

Rachel Bodle
Jun 23, 2022
In General Discussions
Is the green transition happening???? Two job opportunities in a week. This one's with Shaftesbury Town Council: Link to vacancy for Environment and Open Spaces Manager
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Rachel Bodle
Jun 20, 2022
In General Discussions
Planet Shaftesbury received this from the Dorset Climate Action Network. Dorset Climate Action Network (DorsetCAN) is looking to appoint a: Project Coordinator & Public Engagement Specialist Part time – 24 hours per week, £25 per hour for an initial contract of 18 months. DorsetCAN is a network of community groups and individuals working together for a shared vision of a clean, green, sustainable Dorset. We are seeking somebody with a passion for community action on climate change and a drive to make things happen! Somebody with experience of: managing projects and associated budgets organising and delivering public engagement events and activities working with volunteers Application deadline: 14th July 2022. Applicants will be considered before the closing date as we aim to have this position filled as soon as an appropriate candidate is identified. Job description and to apply see website https://www.dorsetcan.org/
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Rachel Bodle
Jun 20, 2022
In General Discussions
Several people from the local area joined in Dorset's first youth climate conference which brought participants ranging from 10-25 years old together with Simon Hoare, MP for North Dorset, as well as councillors from both Dorset Council and Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole Council. You can see the write up in the Dorset Echo here: https://www.dorsetecho.co.uk/news/20204702.young-people-dorset-say-climate-change/ Will Austen of Fontmell Magna was one of the coordinators and sent us this report: On the 7th of June, the Youth Group of the Dorset Climate Action Network (DorsetCAN) hosted their first Youth Climate Conference. In attendance, over Zoom, were local young people from schools including Port Regis and St. Mary’s Marnhull along with councillors from Dorset and BCP councils. Headed by Maya Turner and Will Austen, two members of the Youth Committee at DorsetCAN, the objectives of the conference were threefold: to educate one another on the current state of climate change, to discuss existing local initiatives in place to address climate change, and to consider further progress that can be made in local climate policy to mitigate the environmental impacts of our consumption and broader activity. As a new arm of DorsetCAN, the Youth Conference began with Maya Turner introducing the core values of the Youth Group: Educate, Inspire, and Unite. All those in attendance recognised the importance of collective action in addressing such a serious issue as climate change, and so establishing a sense of collective responsibility from the outset created a strong foundation from which further ideas could be discussed. Then, engaging the young people in attendance through a series of multiple choice questions, members of the conference were given an indication of the overarching sentiment towards climate change. The results revealed that as a collective, we feel that climate change is deeply worrying issue and that policies in place to address it lack a sense of urgency necessary to drive real change. Next, Will Austen provided the group with an overview of the existing state of climate change, alongside existing attempts at the international level to gain consensus on the best action to take to reduce it. Focusing in on the climate emergency in Dorset county, Maya outlined the Climate Action Plans of Dorset and BCP councils, recognising that they have made huge strides in addressing their own carbon footprints, but suggesting that not enough focus has been placed on encouraging non-council members of the county to do the same. A group activity titled ‘If I were an MP for a day’ gave attendees an opportunity to reflect on current climate policy and consider what more they feel can be done. The results of this exercise highlighted addressing fossil fuel based transport in Dorset as a major concern, and revealed an overwhelming desire to include local businesses in climate policy, so that the progress achieved is socially and economically inclusive. Finally, discussion was opened to the floor. Some fantastic questions were asked about environmental issues, ranging from use of commercial pesticides to provision of plastic packaging in local supermarkets. Finally, discussion moved towards successful but lesser known sustainable initiatives, which leveraged the unity of the group in increasing exposure to and education on these important measures. All in all, the conference was a huge success and, in the days following, I felt positive that so many like minded people placed equal importance on the climate issue. However, it also highlighted that not enough is being done, and that this is the start of a tough journey that will require more widespread engagement if we are to come together and deliver on plans to tackle this issue effectively. Will suggests that anyone looking to join should email Dorsetcan@gmail.com
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Rachel Bodle
Jun 04, 2022
In General Discussions
This week's New Scientist leads with a strongly worded critical editorial about the fashion industry. It starts with: "FOR an industry that supposedly thrives on creativity, fashion has been appallingly slow to innovate to reduce its distinctly uncool environmental footprint. On all three fronts in the planetary crisis – climate change, nature loss and waste – manufacturers and retailers of textiles and clothing could, and must, do better. Their carbon emissions are enormous, thirst for raw materials unsustainable and waste management systems rubbish. As just one example, every year we send 350,000 tonnes of clothing to landfill in the UK." and goes on to say consumers must "... shoulder a large portion of the blame, gladly stuffing our wardrobes with cheap, shoddy and unsustainably manufactured garments, destined to be worn a few times and then unceremoniously dumped. Most people on Earth participate in this grotesquely wasteful cycle, helping to make clothing one of the most environmentally destructive industries." The magazine points out that we have a lot of influence: "If patterns of demand change, such as shifting to brands that run buy-back schemes for unwanted clothing, the industry will respond. More powerfully, we can simply choose to wear our clothes for longer. Keeping a garment for an extra year can cut its environmental footprint by 30 per cent. That, of course, requires a shift in our mindsets. But such things can and do happen. A few years ago, plant-based diets were the choice of the unconventional few. Now they are commonplace. We need the same revolution to happen when it comes to clothing choices. Here’s to a make-do-and-mend mindset becoming mainstream – and even fashionable." Loved reading this in the week that Shaftesbury's monthly sustainable fairtrade & vintage clothing market and Repair Revolution Cafe are raising their profile!
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Rachel Bodle
Feb 25, 2022
In General Discussions
Have just received this poster which explains more about the Dorset-wide campaign.
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Rachel Bodle
Feb 17, 2022
In General Discussions
Planet Shaftesbury has been forwarded this newsletter. Would anyone like to be our point of contact for this inspiring initiative? After a great end to 2021 for the Dorset Sustainable Palm Oil Community, we thought we would take this opportunity, at the beginning of 2022, to tell you more about our amazing Ambassadors. Our Ambassadors (scroll down to view them) are individuals, businesses or groups that don’t serve / use / sell food products, but want to show their support to the campaign to make Dorset the world’s first sustainable palm oil county. They have spread the news of our campaign through a wide range of methods including: social media (Lizzie at ethical PR Warrior Agency), blogs (Dorchester BID), articles (Louise Stevens of Stevens.Earth), setting up meetings (Gwyn Jones of Association of Sustainability Practitioners; and lots and lots of introductions (all of the above plus Tammy from Wimborne BID). In addition, Sustainable Dorset has helped spread news of the project by publishing our November newsletter on their website, DorsetCAN (Climate Action Network) has welcomed us as a member of their network, and Planet Wimborne has offered their support to the campaign. Thank you to you all – we really appreciate all that you do. Please contact me if you or your group would like to become an Ambassador. So what has happened in January: We are delighted to announce our 7th school - Piddle Valley First School – has signed up to the Dorset Sustainable Palm Oil Community and are in the process of checking their supply chain. We have provided the email template, and they are using it to ask their lunch provider if there is palm oil in any of their food, and if so, is it sustainable. The Grosvenor Arms in Shaftesbury and The King’s Arms in Dorchester have written about their involvement in the Dorset Sustainable Palm Oil Community on their website – check out the Grosvenor Arms’ website (scroll down – you can’t miss it!) Thanks to Mrs Fearn of St Mary’s Catholic First School in Dorchester, I was invited to speak to all of the DASP (Dorchester Area Schools Partnership) first school headteachers. It was a great opportunity to tell them all about the project, and why it is so important to switch from conventional to sustainable palm oil in the children’s hot lunches. I also told them about the great educational resources that are available on the Chester Zoo website, in particular looking at conservation and sustainable palm oil, covering all Key Stages, across the National Curriculum including English, maths, science, art and music. Includes videos, activities, at home, at school, and a teachers’ pack. Further educational resources are available on the Edsentials website with a wider remit around climate change, including protecting natural habitats, weather and climate, as well as plastics. This was part of the COP26 School Resource Pack. We have worked with all of our pledged champions on their progression, supporting them in asking their suppliers what products / ingredients contain palm oil in, and whether it is sustainable palm oil. Lastly, the news of our campaign continues to spread through lots of meetings but also a great article in the local Ashley Cross magazine, the Ashley Cross Link. The Guardian newspaper also picked up on the Sustainable Palm Oil Communities project – unfortunately Dorset wasn’t mentioned, but other communities including Oxford, Plymouth and Mochdre, the little village in North Wales were! We are still trying to get some champions in Poole, Sherborne, Swanage, Wool, Wareham and Lyme Regis so please pass this newsletter onto anyone who might be interested in those areas (or anywhere else in Dorset!) Number of the month: 1,693. This is the number of students our 7 schools that have pledged to be champions have between them. Five of the seven schools are within the Dorchester Area Schools Partnership. If you have any questions about joining our campaign and becoming a Champion or an Ambassador, please email me. Also, if anyone is interested in us running a short webinar or having a virtual coffee morning chat about palm oil, our Dorset project and why sustainable palm oil is so important in reducing carbon emissions, stopping workers being exploited and protecting rainforests and peatlands, please let me know. Best regards Lucy Lucy Cullinane Operations Director of Efeca Dorset Sustainable Palm Oil Community T: 01305 261050 E: dorsetsustainablecommunity@efeca.com W: https://www.efeca.com/our-work/dorset-sustainable-community/
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Rachel Bodle
Jan 08, 2022
In General Discussions
Ed Bersey has offered to add a list of people willing to share their experience or expertise to the Resources section of this website. Could you give a talk? Do you have experience you could share informally (eg. repairs, home energy, gardening for wildlife, how you travel, ... )? Is there something else you'd like to offer across our network? The list could be used not just by people in Planet Shaftesbury but by other organisations (such as Shaftesbury School), groups, or event organisers (eg. Artemis Festival). To make an offer please provide the following information as appropriate to Ed c/o planetshaftesbury@gmail.com Name: Image (optional): Brief bio - could include indication of area of expertise or experience, role, whether locally-based, keywords (as would be useful in a search facility): Contact details/arrangements: You can use c/o planetshaftesbury@gmail.com if you don't want your email or phone number to appear on the website. SPEAKER topics: EXPERIENCE TO SHARE: OTHER OFFER – eg. guided walks, practical workshop, citizen’s assembly … with indication of time/numbers as appropriate: Planet Shaftesbury connection/history: events where you've been a named contributor
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Rachel Bodle
Nov 26, 2021
In General Discussions
This letter received by Planet Shaftesbury on 13th Dec 2021 Dear friends, We are now moving rapidly to crystallise the basis of the Campaign for a Re-think of the Dorset Local Plan. We aim to launch the formal stage of the County-wide Campaign on Wednesday, 12 January 2022, starting with the submission of the Open Letter to Dorset Council. That letter will be distributed that day to the Press and other media, to all Councillors of Dorset Council to all Town and Parish Councils and - of course - to all Partners in the Campaign Alliance. Our aim is that the publication of that Open Letter will be the start of a surge of actions, which will build cumulative pressure on Dorset Council towards a Re-think of the Local Plan. That surge will depend upon action by all Campaign partner organisations and by the members of those organisations. With that in mind, we plan to hold a Zoom meeting of signed-up partners on Tuesday 11 January, starting at 7 PM. Before that date, we will circulate a short paper outlining ways in which the Campaign can be effectively driven forward, So, we now formally invite your organisation to agree to be a member of the Campaign Alliance; and to co-sign the Open Letter to Dorset Council. (The draft letter has now been deleted - see below for later version) Please will you confirm - as soon as possible and certainly no later than the evening of Thursday 6 January : - That your organisation will join the Campaign Alliance and will co-sign the open letter to Dorset Council - The size of your organisation in terms of number of members, supporters, followers or associated groups - Your intention to attend the meeting of partners on the evening of Tuesday 11 January. We look forward with great pleasure to working with you on this crucial campaign. It is enormously encouraging to find that there is a strongly shared wish to secure a Re-think of a draft Local Plan which - in its current form - could do so much damage to the County, fail to meet the needs of its people and undermine Dorset Council's own Climate and Ecological Emergency Strategy. We believe that a vigorous County-wide campaign, impelled by many organisations and their members, can secure a Local Plan which will protect our precious heritage, meet the real needs of Dorset people and contribute to implementing the Climate and Ecological Emergency Strategy Please will you will reply to all three of us - Peter Bowyer, Dorset CPRE Giles Watts, Dorset Climate Action Network Michael Dower, Dorset Climate Action Network Here is the earlier correspondence which was previously posted in this Forum under the title 'Re-thinking the Dorset Local Plan' The Dorset Climate Action Network (D-CAN) is working with CPRE to develop a strong case and secure a rethink of the draft Local Plan. Two papers were prepared for a pan-Dorset meeting scheduled for late November 2021. The papers are linked here so that Planet Shaftesbury people going to the meeting, or wanting to be involved, can see them. Planet Shaftesbury has previously joined with D-CAN to comment on the Draft Local Plan. Following the meeting we received the following letter which encourages our further involvement: 3 December 2021 from Dorset CAN and Dorset CPRE Campaign Team to All who attended, or were invited to, the second Pan-Dorset meeting on 30 November What a brilliant gathering it was on Tuesday evening ! 37 people representing a wide variety of organisations across the County, which between them have many thousands of members. We were delighted by the numbers that attended and the passion of your response ! It was inspiring to hear what motivates different groups to call for a rethink of the Dorset Local Plan. It was clear that our aims are shared - we all want a Local Plan for truly sustainable development that keeps our precious heritage and meets the real needs of Dorset people as they tackle the Climate and Ecological Emergency. The meeting has given us an updated and rich insight into the campaigning that has already been done; and the skills and contacts which we can draw upon in the main collective part of the campaign, which will start in early January. The aim of that collective action is to build up the pressure on Dorset Council to Re-think the basis of the Plan before they produce an new version - which they plan to do in March or April. At the core of the collective campaign is a proposed Open Letter to Dorset Council, which we circulated in draft before Tuesday's meeting. Our aim now is to use the precious weeks before Christmas to assemble the Alliance of organisations who will co-sign the letter, and to complete the preparations for the formal Launch of the Campaign in early January. As the next step in this rapid process, we invite you please to send to us any comments that you would like to make about the draft Open Letter to Dorset Council; and the Outline paper which suggests how the campaign should be conducted. We attach those two documents (links above), and ask you - please - to send those comments to all three of us by close of play on Tuesday 7 December We will then produce updated drafts of these documents, and send them to you on or soon after 10 December. We will ask you to confirm, by 17 December that you are willing to join the Alliance, to take part in the campaign; and (we hope) to co-sign the letter to Dorset Council. We will then call a Meeting of the Alliance to be held on at 7pm on Tuesday 11 January 2022, in order to formally launch the main campaign. That meeting will agree the action that needs to be taken throughout the County in order to build up a head of public opinion which will really sway the Council to THINK AGAIN. Please will you reserve that date in your New Year diaries. We look forward to hearing from you if you have comments on the two documents. We are delighted to be working with you on this Campaign. From from now on, the momentum will rapidly build. With the energy and passion expressed at Tuesday's meeting, we can win thís fight Peter Bowyer, Dorset CPRE Giles Watts, Dorset CAN Michael Dower, Dorset CAN P.S. To set things rolling, we challenge each recipient of this note to speak to at least 10 people each week about the campaign. This is a good time of year to 'roll a snowball' !.
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Rachel Bodle
Oct 22, 2021
In General Discussions
Publicising this local initiative to support the people who're walking 500miles from London to Glasgow. Will be fun to join in!
October 31st: a walk to mark the start of COP26 content media
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Rachel Bodle
Aug 21, 2021
In General Discussions
This chart compares average household emissions for Shaftesbury & Gillingham.
Reducing your carbon emissions? Here's a local benchmark content media
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Rachel Bodle
Jun 07, 2021
In General Discussions
This Saturday, 12th June, Marnhull Green TEAMS (Taking the Environment Around Marnhull Seriously) has organised an 'Eco Trails' event. There is a map showing the trails for walkers or cyclists to explore the village, passing by nature spots and homes where the householders are willing to share their experiences of aiming to live greener - whether that's the pros & cons of wildlife-friendly gardening, an electric or hybrid car, air-source or ground source heating, or more. There are additional information stalls and refreshments available during the day. Full details in the leaflet downloadable below.
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Rachel Bodle
Apr 15, 2021
In General Discussions
On May 6th along with the referendum on the Neighbourhood Plan and election of Police & Crime Commissioner those of us in West Ward can vote for one of the two candidates to fill a vacancy on the town council. I asked each of them if they'd like to make a comment for our network and have pasted their replies below. From Virginia Edwyn-Jones Many thanks for your email. I have been thinking about your question and exactly what my priorities would be should I be elected. Initially, my mind went blank because I have never been a town councillor before and so there is so much to learn! About how it works, what the fundamentals are, how much scope there is for ideas/ progress/ innovation within the framework and precept. With so much to take on board, I don’t have too many clear cut ideas about what I want to achieve; I think that will become clear as I learn about what the council already has in hand and what goals it has already set itself. I would, firstly, be committed to getting on with the other Councillors and communicating as clearly, calmly and productively as possible! I will arrive with those subjects that are already close to my heart, such as the economic health of our town, protecting our heritage and the beauty of our town, together with enhancing those parts of Shaftesbury that are not in a conservation area. I’m very interested to find out what the Green Spaces group are up to, where all the new trees have been planted, what’s been planted and what else is planned. And of course, current and future developments – doing our utmost to hold developers to account, to ensure developers stick to the planning conditions of the development and that they deliver what they promise. None of which is within the gift of a town council of course, but we must exert as much pressure as we can on Dorset Council without alienating them. And as I write this, I am reminded that one of the reasons I don’t know is that it is not always clear what the town council has in hand and I have frequently commented to various councillors before that communicating their actions and what they are doing to fellow Shastonians is very important, so that’s something I would like to look at. Of course, that we know as much as we do is largely down to the brilliance of This Is Alfred, but I think the Council does more than people give it credit for and this should be known and understood more widely. I do have a few big ideas but I don’t think it would be prudent at this moment to discuss them – I would hate to sound presumptuous or arrogant in any way. There is so much to understand first, one topic of which of course is climate change and what our Council’s views and commitments to it are; whilst Dorset Council has acknowledged a Climate Emergency, how does that filter down to individual Councils? Does it filter down at all and if not, what actions could our Council take to contribute to reducing our waste and emissions? Whatever the answer to that is, it is crystal clear that such considerations must be at the very forefront of how our town evolves. I think that’s it for now. I hope that sounds OK, thanks for asking me! From Mike Madgwick Thank you for the contact regarding the West Ward elections. I would not necessarily describe my list as priorities, as in an elected body of 12 persons, one must constantly convince the majority on any particular position for that public body to pursue – thus the first thing is to enhance the level of reasoned and well consulted dialogue to focus on the issues, not personalities, to do that which delivers a sustainable set of results for future generations. I see a role on council and the role of council to do two things – direct the functions which are 100% within its gift to enhance our environmental activities/impact, and, on those items where the council is a consultee (be it designated statutory or courtesy), it become a valued voice of reason that is increasingly sought out as it speaks with a wisdom others respect as an advocate for the many changes we humans need to make to rebalance our relationship with the planet that sustains us – and all other life. Taking the items 100% within the control of council – this breaks down into assets the council owns and manages such as; open spaces, buildings and capabilities (such as say grounds team equipment). Much good work has occurred and we have much to be proud of, yet we cannot sit back, we can always do a bit more, be this extending where we can wildlife verges, diversified ecological spaces on council land, tree planting as a legacy, work on the common land, through to how the council uses hydrocarbon powered equipment, through to such things as buying ethically from power suppliers (i.e. do we currently use a renewable resources electricity supplier). On just fuel usage to hover over this in some detail; if I take the electricity that is stated in the council’s accounts to be from Southern Electric. The web-site shows that this utility supplier has only 51.9% of renewables (48.1% is natural gas): https://sse.co.uk/v3/assets/blt09078e271abddd45/blt04622618eb198f78/5f6e06c9981e5e4546772fb0/energy_fuel-mix.pdf?utm_medium=print&utm_source=sse&utm_campaign=online-energy&utm_content=fuel-mix&WT.mc_id=print%7Csse%7Conline-energy%7Cfuel-mix Ecotricity (I have no vested interest I hasten to add other than a desire to see us explore and change that which we can to benefit all) is billed as a 100% renewable electricity supplier....thus to show the council’s meaning – why not wake-up tomorrow morning and change suppliers? The point of progress does not have to be to Ecotricity – some more research is needed for reasoned decisions, yet we can send a message about how commitment turns into positive change. https://www.ecotricity.co.uk/our-green-energy/green-electricity?partner=GO1&gclid=Cj0KCQjwpdqDBhCSARIsAEUJ0hOc9E55ge2lEn5qbBbnzZB06BhGocxuPHWXfFLQMSAeCVkxaM7Nx7saAlryEALw_wcB To push this point: Electricity supplier is something we can all change almost at the drop of a hat and it has meaning in delivering a positive change in consumption habits. Then turning to fuel – we use fuelGenie today - this is a fuel card savings scheme – yet does this drive to usage of reduced non-renewable hydrocarbons – today I do not know that detailed answer but I do know where to start asking questions and how to drive a solution as I illustrate with electricity supplier. There are increasingly hydrocarbon fuels with reduced refined oil content – can we migrate to these as a stepping stone away from dependency(?) Thus these are just two items that change rhetoric into positive outcomes on the theme of that which is 100% of one’s control as a public body. We can progressively become that exemplar of how a small parish makes quality positive choices. The many other items need the same level of debate and analysis along with the key ingredient of involving our public in each and every step of the journey. Involvement of the public then educates the second theme, that of being an influencer of standing – the list here is pretty long, so I’ll just limit myself to a few headlines...which I trust encapsulate the direction of travel I’d like to see us collectively take as society. A parish council being the lowest level of civil government, yet I would hope the most intimate with the needs of its community – today, tomorrow and those aspects that do not have a vote but rely upon us to discharge our long-term duty of care for environmental matters. So a headings list that each could be developed into major discussion point (from the major to the more immediately tangible) where the council can have a position that constructively challenges that which just gets gulped down in some quarters as what we must accept, as we are told that is all that is on offer: Housing development driven by true local need – knock these thoroughly discredited housing number algorithms on the head once and for all Sustainable housing standards that really have bite Development with associated sustainable infrastructure Connectivity – from making high speed broadband real for the many, through to transport that progressively lessens the need for non-renewable hydrocarbons, thus to Electric charge points (having enough of them to make a difference) so make planning rules a force for better change Vehicle sharing schemes in rural areas Best use of brown field and existing sites Sharing other local council resources to make sustainable assets more affordable Presumption against green field to re-use Public access to land for exercise and recreation and mental wellbeing Down to simple things like more allotment spaces to reduce waiting lists (which the council can take into its 100% capable of influencing list) Some items are said by certain politicians to be above our pay grade – I disagree – the debates and head of steam for change has to start somewhere and who better than the mass of the population who are increasingly wanting a different direction of travel to that which some parts of the political (and lobbying) establishment wish to guide us along. Frankly we have an eye watering array of choices on the ‘can constructively influence list’ and each needs attention – it will be for the voters to also show their active support in telling all layers of government that we cannot keep doing the ‘same old’, along with what they want as our priorities, these must be our priorities and ultimately I have always been of the view that when engaged, voters have an enviable knack of applying common sense and vision where some leaders become entangled in aspiring to mediocrity and failing in that lacklustre ambition. I trust this helps with illustrated enthusiasm (and practical example) as to why this is more than just a campaigning item – the issues are now no longer debates, they are in the must grasp now category.
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Rachel Bodle
Mar 19, 2021
In General Discussions
During 2019 we were holding relatively informal physical meetings in the Town Hall. They were on the 3rd Thursday of the month, started at 7.30 and lasted around 2 hours. We also hosted occasional talks that were promoted around the town and brought more people in. Bit more structure. Often also on a Thursday but we've used other nights. And then last year, just a year ago, everything changed. On 12th March we hosted a talk in the Town Hall by someone from the Dorset Waste Partnership. One week later on 19th March we had an online meeting on Zoom. Since then there have been short, relatively informal Zoom meetings almost every Thursday. The number of people joining in has been perhaps half the number coming to the Town Hall on a regular basis - but as with those physical meetings, people vary from week to week. Although lots of things seem to have stood still, there has been much change over the past year. There's a greater sense of urgency around responding to climate breakdown and the threats to nature. We've not remained inactive. We've kept in touch with one another in a variety of ways; some new people have joined in; there have been occasional carefully distanced events. And now we can start to think about how we want meetings to be when we can make them happen. At some point we could restart the monthly meetings in the Town Hall. When? We could arrange more public talks in the Town Hall ... or online? When? We could keep the Zoom meetings going - weekly? Or occasionally? Or in weeks when there wasn't a Town Hall meeting? We could have regular other meetings. A pub night - 'green drinks'? A cafe session - 'green teas'? A walk? At last night's Zoom meeting we bandied these questions around without reaching any conclusions. What do you think? What would work best for you? Do you want to help to host / convene / facilitate / or otherwise support any of these? Let's assemble ideas over the next few weeks and take time to adjust slowly! Please comment here ... Rachel
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